Thinking about getting an MBA? You should be

Getting a master’s degree is a major commitment of time, energy, and money, so returning to school — even if you’re thinking about a part-time program that allows you to keep working — is one of the biggest decisions of your career. Welcome to adulting!

The value of an MBA

There are a few degrees that have instant name recognition and can almost certainly open doors for you in your career. But technical degrees, a JD, or an MD don’t have the wide applicability of an MBA. Having an MBA tells potential employers, those in your network, and those in your organization that you have the fundamental business knowledge to apply yourself and excel in any setting.

Although there are many advantages to a full-time MBA program, especially for those seeking new careers, you can give yourself an edge in a part-time or online MBA. It’s ideal for those looking to advance within their company or current role and it allows you to put the skills you learn into practice on the job right away.

Alumni satisfaction

In a recent survey conducted by the Graduate Management Admissions Council, alumni indicate overwhelming satisfaction with their degree, both in terms of career path and salary:

The majority of business school alumni feel their graduate management education advanced their careers at a faster rate compared with peers who do not have a graduate management education. Recent alumni tend to be employed in mid-level positions (49%), while those who graduated earlier have climbed into senior, executive, or c-suite positions.

And while the amount varies by job level and location, the median base salary among alumni with a graduate business degree is $115,000 in 2018.

The bottom line

An MBA can enhance managerial and leadership skills, develop new strengths, expand your network, and crucially, open the door to a higher salary and better career outcomes. Complete the form on this page to learn more about the highly ranked Full-time, Professional Flex, Online, and Executive MBA options from Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business.